Tag: Botanical Garden

3 Amazing Things To Do In North Carolina

Living in North Carolina, I’m lucky enough to experience all of the beauty that the state has to offer. But sometimes, I forget that most others have never even been to North Carolina before, let alone the east coast. That being said, I would like to share some of the beautiful things that visitors can see and do when in the Tar Heel State. Here are, in no particular order, three things to do when visiting North Carolina.

 

Visit the Sarah P. Duke Gardens

For those of you who are curious about the flora of the Old North State, be sure to visit the Sarah P. Duke Gardens. Bringing in over 300,000 visitors each year, the Sarah P. Duke Gardens are located in the heart of Duke University. The Gardens’ Blomquist Garden is undoubtedly its most unique and enticing attraction. Featuring over 900 species of regional native plants, a wildlife and carnivorous plants section and a relaxing bird watching area, the Blomquist Garden is a botanist’s dream. The Gardens also feature an 18-acre Asiatic Arboretum, a series of historic gardens, a cafe and a souvenir shop. Bring the family for children and adult-oriented educational programs. With so much natural beauty to experience, Sarah P. Dukes Gardens are definitely a must see for North Carolina visitors and natives alike.

 

Family Fun at Carowinds

One of North Carolina’s more adrenaline-fueled attractions, Carowinds is an amusement park that packs as much of a punch as Six Flags or Universal Studios. With 10 heart-pounding rides—Afterburn and Hurler are standouts—Carowinds is guaranteed to prove a much needed escape from a stressful work week. And, for those that are not as keen on losing your lunch, Carowinds offers a bevy of family friendly rides, including Plants Vs. Zombies Garden Warfare: 3Z Arena and the Do-Si-Do. If you’re visiting during the sweltering summer months, make sure to visit Carolina Harbor, Carowinds’ water park. With food, fun and thrills, Carowinds is sure to offer an exciting trip to North Carolina, for both families and singles.

North Carolina Zoo

For those more interested in fauna, North Carolina’s got you covered. Visitors can enjoy a trip through Africa, with a multitude of wildlife that populates the African plains, featuring lions to elephants to sitatungas. From there, visitors can take a stroll through the R.J. Reynolds Forest Aviary which contains more than a whopping 3,000 exotic plants and several birds, from the Chilean flamingo to the amethyst starling. Finally, visit familiar yet exciting territory at the North America exhibit. Featuring animals from arctic tundras to swampy marshes, the North America exhibit features the most eclectic mix of animals throughout the zoo. The zoo even features several kid-friendly attractions and events and a 4-D theater that takes visitors on an exciting prehistoric adventure. All of this combined makes the North Carolina Zoo one of the nation’s greatest.

The North Carolina Botanical Garden

Jonathan Farber PhDThe North Carolina Botanical Garden is a hidden gem located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and operated by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The core mission statement of the Botanical Garden is: “To inspire understanding, appreciation, and conservation of plants in gardens and natural areas and to advance a sustainable relationship between people and nature,” (Ncbg.unc.edu). For over 40 years, the North Carolina Botanical Garden has been a leading education center and plant conservation in the southeast, committed to serving the public.

The University of North Carolina’s first botany professor, William Chambers Coker is one of the main founders of the Botanical Garden. In 1903, Coker taught his students outdoors by showing them various plants and trees located on campus. In the mid 1920’s, Coker and one of his most passionate students, Henry Roland Totten, came up with the idea to create a larger, complete garden area just south of the main campus. Later, in 1952, Trustees of the University dedicated 70 acres for development of the garden, with another 103 acres donated shortly after.

William Lanier Hunt, a former student of both Coker and Totten not only donated those 103 acres for the Garden, but he also helped establish the Garden’s membership support organization, now known as the Botanical Garden Foundation. In April of 1966, the Garden had its first public opening, offering Nature Trails throughout the Garden for all to enjoy.

Jonathan Farber PhDOver the years, the Garden has acquired major establishments, including the Coker Arboretum, the Mason Farm Biological Reserve, Battle Park, and the University of North Carolina Herbarium. The lands have expanded to over 700 acres and is now a nationally recognized conservation that offers a wide array of programs for those interested to participate in. Some of these programs include: conservation programs, horticultural therapy, botanical illustration, native plant studies, and educational collections.

In addition, the North Carolina Botanical Garden is a vital resource for experts studying wildflowers and native plants of North Carolina. Its Center for Plant Conservation is one of just 36 institutions throughout the United States to hold a National Collection of Endangered Species. The Garden is also a pioneer of various plant rescue techniques and was the first garden in North America to establish an exotic pest plant policy.

The North Carolina Botanical Garden is undoubtedly a beautiful resource that North Carolina is proud to own. For more information about the garden, please visit their website here.